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Symposium | Indent: The Body and The Performative, November 2018, New Delhi, India

Talking Third Circle is a work-in-progress solo that is an embodiment of a hybrid identity, explored through a rhythmic percussive pulsing of the body in relationship to the land by movement artist Chloe Chotrani. This will be present at Indent: The Body and The Performative, hosted by Gati Dance.

This is made possible with the support of the National Arts Council, Singapore.

Spread over four days, the symposium INDENT collates practices and ideas that enable, expand, and cluster around current notions of the body in performance, through a programme of talks, performances and work-in-progress sharings. It also marks the launch of Gati’s eponymous annual journal, Indent: The Body and The Performative, a digital publication which in its first edition examines the ways in which the body demonstrates and deploys strategies of resistance, throwing up fresh questions about the relationship between the political and the aesthetic. The symposium also forms the backdrop for Indent Lab, a workshop and laboratory space that begins to consider what the act of writing adds up to in the tactile and febrile landscape of the digital interface.


Indent: The Body and the Performative is supported by Goethe-Institut/ Max Mueller Bhavan New Delhi and Pro Helvetia - Swiss Arts Council.


 
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Stagings. Soundings. Readings. Free Jazz II: Re-Collections by Alexandra Pirici, NTU-Centre for Contemporary Art, November 2018, Singapore

Alexandra Pirici’s choreography explores the possibility of collectively assembling memories of human and non-human presence on the planet. The performative exercise remediates, materialises, repeats, hybridises, mutates, amplifies and re-signifies the following natural elements, art-historical references, memories or sensations.


Performers: Ying Cai, Weixin Chong, Chloe Chotrani, Nina Djekic, Farid Fairuz, Adam Lau, Je Leung, Loo Zihan, Yue Ru Ma, Hanna Mikosch, Yulin Ng, Rachel Nip, Isabel Phua, Jamil Schulze

1. Raden Saleh, Forest Fire painting
2. Swarm movement
3. Chun Kai Feng, Totem sculpture
4. Sensing movement specific to cats
5. Volcano: a feeling of a sudden gathering, abruptly changing the landscape and the atmosphere
6. A percussive pulse
7. Ezra Pound poem
8. Moon and moonlight song excerpt
9. Plant life: Bristlecone pine trees, Mangrove trees
10. Animal life: gorillas, tigers, eel colonies, green hornbill birdsong
11. The sound of waves
12. Land reclamation action
13. Guanyin sculpture accompanied by a tiger or a dragon
14. Antonio Canova, Psyche Revived by Cupid’s Kiss
15. Bertold Brecht, Questions from a worker who reads
16. Protester holding invisible banner or activist, and artist Seelan Palay performing 32 Years: The Interrogation of a Mirror
17. Suzann Victor, Still Waters
18. Camille Claudel, Sakuntala
19. Nat King Cole, Nature Boy song

 

XHE by Daniel Kok and Miho Shimizu, October 2018, Singapore/Australia

“The metaphor I would have to describe Chotrani, Shimizu and Nova is that of oxygen. A presence that is light, omnipresent, and necessary to sustain the spectacular performing body. Chotrani in particular, with a practice she refers to as focused on “studies of softness”, worked in the background to prepare for Kok and Tymiński’s outbursts of spectacular movement. She modelled a mode of alert and responsible spectatorship as she positioned herself among the rest of us – gently asking the younger spectators to focus, and smiling as she invited you to make way. I would call it a mode of conscientious pre-emptive watching, where she is viewing the present filtered through the perspective of the always arriving future. Her contingent body is in a constant state of preparedness, hovering always slightly above the ground between landing and taking off.” — Loo Zihan for Arts Equator “XHE”: Caught Between a Square and Octopus by Arts Equator

XHE at da:ns festival at Esplanade - Theatres by the Bay, Singapore, Oct 12-14, 2018

XHE at Performance Space, Sydney, Australia, Oct 19 & 21, 2018

Experience a remarkable collision of dance, sculpture and live electronic music with xhe. Unfolding over the length of an evening, this immersive performance envelops the audience in a search for the elusive xhe: a figure that is not “he”, not “she”, nor “it”. Moving within a kaleidoscope of shifting patterns, moving objects, syncretic sounds, uncanny forms and enchanting moments, the artists will create a shared space of imagination and collective daydream in which to summon, receive, discover, and even become xhe.

 
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SCOPE #3 at Dance Nucleus, 5pm - 6pm Sept 21, 2018

‘Talking Third Circle’ a work-in-progress solo piece by movement artist Chloe Chotrani explores the body in relationship to the land.

 
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Sub After Dark: Going, Going, Gone...???, The Substation, September 15, 2018

Sub After Dark (SAD) is a multidisciplinary event that celebrates the peculiarities of The Substation. Kicking off with a panel discussion on intangible heritage and following a series of local performances. I will be your ‘mystery guest’, dancing for and with SA The Collective, an experimental music community.

 

"Bukit Brown Index #132: Triptych of the Unseen" by Post-Museum at The Substation, August 21 - September 23, 2018

Triptych of the Unseen (三聯九回腸) is the latest work in Post-Museum’s Bukit Brown Index series. A virtual reality installation, this work features 3 characters (Ghost, Bureaucrat and Activist), who will present various perspectives on the on-going dialogue on the development of Bukit Brown. 

Featuring Choreography by Bernice Lee in collaboration with Jereh Leung and Chloe Chotrani. Join us for the opening on 21 Aug at 6pm.

Exhibition period: 21 Aug to 23 Sep (Wed-Sun 12-8pm) - free entry
Part of Deathsong, which is part of The Substation’s En Bloc, Or Buildings Must Die programme 

 
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Brazilipinas with SAMBA Imperatriz Filipinese, Manila, Philippines, August 2018

 

Pallavi with Stillness, Esplanade Theatre Studio, July 2018

Review - Pallavi with Stillness seductive and intriguing by Five Lines Asia

"The piece evolves into a wild and flirtatious stamping rhythm and the ensemble gathers in a composition that spins 360 degrees while the bodies continually shift positions and capture the empty spaces left in between one another, but what really stands out in this instant is the mass movement more so than the intricate small detail, like a human-helix spiraling down in the deep ocean. It’s magical." - Ezekiel Oliveira

In this, the third and final iteration of Raka Maitra’s dialogic explorations of the abstract space of classical odissi and the general categories of seeing, specifically space, time and movement, the focus will squarely be on the dancer’s torso.

Each previous iteration in the Pallavi series had its unique focus; Pallavi and Spacehighlighted the primacy of the chowk position (“first position” literally and metaphorically) in odissi—a low plie, embodying the dancer’s concentrated consciousness and availability to execute any movement in the repertoire. Pallavi in Time spotlighted the tribhang (tri-bent) standing stance, characteristic of both odissi and Hindu temple sculpture. The aim: To elaborate the delicate, delight of the dancer’s body cutting into time, marked by rhythm, the beat of a song or reverberation footfalls.

Now, in Pallavi with Stillness, Raka’s choreography works to deconstruct odissi grammar by first isolating and then accenting torso movements—a stunning, mesmerising feature of the dance’s repertoire. As in all previous iterations, the choreography is original, bold and utterly of the dancer’s skill, technique and commitment. 

A pallavi is a repeated refrain in carnatic music, In Raka’s work it refers to choreographic elaborations; lines of increasingly complex movement, placement, stillness, and shifting balances extrapolated from the grammar and repertoire of odissi.  The terminus is a sequence of liquid sculpture in seas of sound—sans role, sans character, sans story. In pure dance, and pleasure.

 

KEMAS at the Esplanade Concourse, July 2018

KEMAS - translated loosely in English, means ‘tidy'. It is customary before festive seasons, that people and their houses do some spring cleaning.

Exploring meticulous behaviour & everyday chores, this roving piece brings new life to the spaces in Esplanade.

Come kemas with the dancers from P7:1SMA in this piece, suitable for families and children!

 

 
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Panel Discussion on Post-Colonial Tactics with Mandeep Raikhy, May 2018

"Raikhy is our second mentor for ELEMENT working under the subject of “Post-Colonial Tactics” he will be working with Artists in Residence Bernice Lee and Chloe Chotrani at Dance Nucleus in May. Together, they will unearth particular responses to questions on post-colonialism in the local context. On the one hand, ownership of one’s traditions is a credible response to reclaim a society’s identity in post-colonial times, not least in advanced urban societies where cultural memories tend to be short. On the other hand, romantic nostalgia and self-exoticisation can be construed as counter-intuitive, whereby instead of reclaiming one’s place in the world, one remains trapped in a (self-)designated position of the Other."

 
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Artist in Resident at Dance Nucleus, Elements, Singapore, Jan - Jun 2018

Tackling the topic of "Postcolonial Tactics"

Power of Softness

By way of soft, to confront the cultural amnesia that has erased historical stories of when the womb/women were the central focus of power in society. Growing up in what is defined as the third world; discourse on identity is inherently a struggle to tackle as a social and artistic practice. The postcolonial subject and perspective comes from the South, the below, the subaltern, the minority, the fringes. Embodied tactics will be developed from the gut, the belly and source of soft as a creative power to be explored through collective conversations, performance making and furious dancing.

 
 work in progress by Chloe Chotrani and Byb Bibene, at the Valley of Fire in Nevada, 2017

work in progress by Chloe Chotrani and Byb Bibene, at the Valley of Fire in Nevada, 2017

Work-In-Progress: (Untitled) by Byb Bibene and Chloe Chotrani (2017-18)

Filmed at the Valley of Fire in Nevada

 

selected, 2012-2017

Dance Omi 2017 Artist Residency, OMI International Arts Center, New York 2017

The Dance Omi International Dance Collective brought together eleven accomplished dance artists from around the world for three weeks of creative exchange. Though the program focuses on a facilitated process of experimentation and cross cultural collaboration.

 

Talking Circles, Movement Research at Eden’s Expressway, New York, 2017

Talking Circles is about embodied cyclical ways of living 

“Celebration of the feminine, which felt particularly healing at this point.” – Eva Schmidt, Visual Artist, New York

“The sense of you luxuriating in your body, really enjoying the movement, the real sense of deriving a kinesthetic pleasure in what you are doing, that was communicated strongly.” – Bilquis Hijjas, Contemporary Dance Producer, Malaysia

“The kinesthetic awareness was also happening in your face, in your gaze, your gaze would go from hard to soft. How you wanted us to see you and through how you see us.” – Laura Atwell, Artist in Residence, Movement Research, New York

 

Tectonic Remains, TOPAZ Art Gallery, Queens, New York, 2016

“TOPAZ ARTS is pleased to host Tectonic Remains – a collaborative working by visual artist Leeroy New, movement artist Chloe Chotrani and composer Yasuno Miyauchi. The informal showing will took place on Friday, October. 7, 2016 at at TOPAZ ARTS in Woodside, Queens, NY.”

 

Seen and Unseen, Storm King, New York, 2017

A short film directed and performed by designer Yoko Murakami and dancer Chloe Chotrani, music composed by Chatori Shimizu. Seen and Unseen uses minimalism to portray the space in between sentences and the silent moments during a conversation. Nature, sculpture and bodies create intimacy and tension.

 

Silence is Noise, ROOM SALON in Willamsburg, New York 2017

Silence is Noise was a performance installation by movement artists Chloe Chotrani and Yoko Murakami, composer Chatori Shimizu and hair artist Takeo Suzuki. They explored the hair salon as a space of shedding old ways and recreating oneself. Guests were welcome to experience the salon as a cross-cultural, creative and social venue. The performance occurred in short excerpts throughout the evening.

 

Three Boroughs, FLOW17 Festival at Randall's Island, New York, 2016

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance and the Bronx Museum of the Arts present FLOW.16 Festival at Randall’s Island Park, New York City. Three Boroughs was conceived by sculptor Tracie Hervy. On Saturday Sept 17th, five choreographers presented movement work inspired by Three Boroughs. Choreographer, Chloe Chotrani framed the movements with Tracie’s piece by utilizing structured improvisation and movement mapping.

 
 

Black Dance Forms: Resistance and Engagement, Ecole Des Sables, Senegal, West Africa 2015

26 dancers from around the world came together at Ecole Des Sables. For six weeks they learned traditional West African dance forms, co-choreographed together and responded to media and articles touching on race relations and topics of resistance through black dance forms.

 

Freestyle Battle, Metro Manila, 2014

Againts Krumper Switch. One of many battles in the street dance community. 

 

 

The Call Out Battle, Metro Manila, 2014

The only female and one of five representatives of the "South" team for a group battle and performance. A large and united gathering of the whole street dance community in Metro Manila. 

 

Distant Early Warning (D.E.W), Chloe x Lustbass, Philippines, 2015

Movement was translated into soundscapes as dialogue between bassist and dancer. Rather than the conventional movement derived from music, the process was reversed - movement translated into sound. This is a project along side make-up artist Boombee Bartolome and filmmaker Judd Figuerres.